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Cars

Bentley Flying Spur vs. Rolls Royce Ghost

A few weeks ago, Rolls-Royce revealed the second generation Ghost. The original unveiling was expected for February 2020; however, the COVID-19 pandemic meant it was postponed. This new generation Ghost is a state-of-art Rolls-Royce that will be heating up the competition with the latest Bentley Flying Spur.

After Bentley stopped manufacturing the Mulsanne, the Flying Spur became the flagship sedan that was expected to compete with the Rolls-Royce Ghost and the Mercedes-Benz Maybach S-Class. But how does the Flying Spur compare to the Ghost? They both have British DNA and bespoke tailoring inside the cabins, but which comes out on top?

Bentley’s Flying Spur is based on the Porsche Panamera modular platform – it is a reskinned Panamera. That is not particularly negative, because future technologies from Porsche can be implemented rapidly to the Flying Spur; however, it does reduce the exclusivity of the car. Not ideal if you are keen to own something bespoke.

Despite the shared modular platform, the Flying Spur is designed with both comfort and dynamic driving in mind. When you take to the driver’s seat of the Flying Spur, you won’t look odd. The Panamera’s suspension and drive train geometry offer a sportive driving character wrapped in luxury and comfort. It offers two engine options – W12 and V8 – mated with a twin-clutch 8-speed automatic. It is impossible to ignore the rear-biased all-wheel-drive system; Flying Spur is a proper driver’s car. The W12 engine is slowly being phased out, and this feels like the right choice. It was inherited from the VW Phaeton and was probably designed in the late 1990s. The V8 is lighter and more responsive, coming from the Porsche Panamera.

In terms of luxury, Bentley are renowned for offering some of the best interiors and attention to detail! Every part of the interior is a piece of artwork; you will be surrounded by more luxury than you can imagine. Sadly, the driving assistance systems are not as sophisticated as those boasted by the Ghost. I was expecting to see the same level of driving assistances as those in the Audi A8; however, the Flying Spur is a few years behind that. Overall, the Flying Spur is a great luxury sedan, and you will feel the Bentley DNA and experience exquisite luxury.

Moving to the new Ghost, let me start from the bottom end. The modular platform of the Rolls-Royce is unique solely to Rolls-Royce models. Whilst the Ghost does not share a platform with the BMW 7-Series; however, there is still some technology sharing with the BMW Group. With the volume of the Rolls-Royce, they can’t survive without benefitting from BMW’s know-how. Sadly, the Ghost did not receive a brand new engine, which is not too surprising given that it is not easy to redesign a V12, especially when it will be only used by three low-volume Rolls-Royce. The V12 engine is therefore based on the BMW V12.

The good news is that the Ghost is an ultimate luxury car that does not blind. The sound insulation is state-of-art engineering. It was reportedly too good and resulted in passengers experiencing motion sickness. To avoid this, Rolls-Royce has increased the amount of interior sound.

Unlike the Flying Spur, driving the Ghost by yourself still looks a bit awkward; you look like a professional driver in need of a client. In future, a possible Black series could make it more of a driver’s car. The best part of the new Ghost is the driving assistance system. BMW equipped the new Ghost with state-of-art technologies. Now, the Ghost can scan the road surface and adjust its suspension via 48-volt electric actuators, and offers perfectly refined comfort. Long journeys will certainly not be an issue with the new Ghost.

The interior quality is more sophisticated than the previous generation and is on par with the Phantom; however, I still think the Bentley is better by a slight margin (albeit a hard to notice margin!).

Finally, the new Ghost has an all-wheel-drive system adapted from BMW, which is amazing! The BMW xDrive is one of the best all-wheel-drive systems available. Rolls-Royce didn’t stop here and implemented rear-wheel drive steering to improve the driving experience. Overall, the new Ghost is more driver-focused than before, and I am sure it offers a competitive driving experience to Bentley Flying Spur.

The final verdict is yours—the differences between the Bentley and the Rolls-Royce are such a close margin that, ultimately, it comes down to personal taste.

Photo Credit // Rolls Royce & Bentley Motors

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Cars

New Rolls Royce Ghost // HR Owen, Mayfair London

Recently, Rolls-Royce revealed the second generation Ghost. And I had the chance to see it at the HR Owen Mayfair London dealer. The first generation Ghost was unveiled in 2010. It was based on the F01 BMW 7 Series platform and uses a 6.6lt V12 N74 family engine with a ZF 8-speed automatic gearbox. It was a great success for the Rolls-Royce; the Ghost enabled them to reach a new audience and begin to capture Bentley’s market share. Also, a coupé and cabriolet version of the Ghost was revealed, named Dawn and Wraith respectively, both of which were very successful.

A decade has passed since Rolls-Royce first released the Ghost. This time, it is based on the Rolls-Royce’s in-house modular platform shared with the latest Phantom and Cullinan models. Instead of using the BMW 7-Series platform, Rolls-Royce wanted to create their own. However, the new Ghost features a 6.75lt V12 N74 family BMW engine. Sadly, Rolls-Royce does not have an engine factory yet (as far as I am aware).

The new Ghost is an all-wheel-drive based on BMW x-Drive technology (a perfect choice) including all-wheel steering. Now you can have the magic carpet experience driving the new Ghost. The front camera and laser scanner analyses the road surface and adjusts the suspension for added comfort. The Ghost is quieter than before; actually, too quiet, causing passengers to experience motion sickness. Therefore, they had to increase the noise level inside the cabin. Rolls-Royce also developed a new upper wishbone damper unit that has never been seen on any other car’s drivetrain.

BMW have included their latest driving assistance system in the new Ghost. I know Rolls-Royce does not wish to mention any mutual technology with the BMW, but without the BMW’s know-how, the Ghost would simply be an analogue car. To stay current in the luxury car market, you need a big company behind you. Just look at Aston Martin, no one is supporting them, and they struggle to keep up with the competition.

People usually say the features I mention are not particularly luxurious. However, the definition of luxury has changed dramatically. If your car does not have smartphone connectivity, it is obsolete. Overall, new Ghost is an amazing car will definitely regain the market share lost to the Bentley Flying Spur.

New Rolls Royce Ghost

New Rolls Royce Ghost

New Rolls Royce Ghost

New Rolls Royce Ghost

New Rolls Royce Ghost

New Rolls Royce Ghost

New Rolls Royce Ghost

New Rolls Royce Ghost

New Rolls Royce Ghost

New Rolls Royce Ghost

New Rolls Royce Ghost

New Rolls Royce Ghost

New Rolls Royce Ghost

New Rolls Royce Ghost

New Rolls Royce Ghost

New Rolls Royce Ghost

New Rolls Royce Ghost

New Rolls Royce Ghost

New Rolls Royce Ghost

New Rolls Royce Ghost

New Rolls Royce Ghost

New Rolls Royce Ghost

New Rolls Royce Ghost

New Rolls Royce Ghost

New Rolls Royce Ghost

New Rolls Royce Ghost

New Rolls Royce Ghost

New Rolls Royce Ghost

New Rolls Royce Ghost

New Rolls Royce Ghost

New Rolls Royce Ghost

New Rolls Royce Ghost

New Rolls Royce Ghost

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Cars

Pastel Coloured Rolls Royce Cullinan, Ghost, Dawn and Wraith

Rolls-Royce recently released a new colour scheme at Pebble Beach. You might be thinking that Rolls-Royce already offers an infinite number of colours, so how can they offer a new scheme? The issue with the indefinite number of colours is our brain. Our brains have limited cognitive power; so, when you overload them, they cannot make a decision and stick to the status quo. I have covered this in my other blog.

Let us return to the new colour scheme: it is pastel colours. At the moment, they are available for Ghost Black, Dawn Black, Wraith Black and Cullinan models. Does it sound a bit too ‘softy’ for Rolls-Royce? Actually, this new colour scheme totally changed my perception of Rolls-Royce cars. Quite honestly, they constitute state-of-the-art technology on wheels, coupled with an interesting and eclectic clientele. The bespoke combinations I saw with the Rolls-Royce cars gave me a really big shock!

Also, the Ghost series (Wraith and Dawn) are based on the previous generation BMW 7-Series, so I struggle to like them anymore. They are quite old in terms of technology. However, it seems like the pastel colour scheme has changed everything. The Rolls-Royce car range looks much softer and down to earth. The pastel colour scheme has transformed the vehicles, making them more appealing to a new customer range. Basically, Rolls-Royce head office has applied the ‘framing effect’ principle from Behavioural Economics.

In the event that you are planning to buy a brand-new Rolls-Royce; I would highly recommend the new pastel colour scheme.


Pastel Coloured Rolls Royce Pastel Colour Rolls Royce Cullinan Pastel Colour Rolls Royce Cullinan Pastel Colour Rolls Royce Cullinan Pastel Colour Rolls Royce Cullinan Pastel Colour Rolls Royce Cullinan Pastel Colour Rolls Royce Cullinan Pastel Colour Rolls Royce Cullinan Pastel Colour Rolls Royce Cullinan Pastel Colour Rolls Royce Cullinan Pastel Colour Rolls Royce Cullinan Pastel Colour Rolls Royce Cullinan Pastel Colour Rolls Royce Cullinan Pastel Coloured Rolls Royce Cullinan Pastel Coloured Rolls Royce Pastel Coloured Rolls Royce Pastel Coloured Rolls Royce Pastel Coloured Rolls Royce Pastel Coloured Rolls Royce Pastel Coloured Rolls Royce Pastel Coloured Rolls Royce Pastel Coloured Rolls Royce

Pastel Coloured Rolls RoycePastel Coloured Rolls RoycePastel Coloured Rolls RoycePastel Colour Rolls Royce Cullinan Pastel Colour Rolls Royce Cullinan Pastel Colour Rolls Royce Cullinan Pastel Colour Rolls Royce Cullinan Pastel Colour Rolls Royce Cullinan Pastel Colour Rolls Royce Cullinan Pastel Colour Rolls Royce Cullinan Pastel Colour Rolls Royce Cullinan Pastel Colour Rolls Royce Pastel Colour Rolls Royce Pastel Colour Rolls Royce Pastel Colour Rolls Royce Pastel Colour Rolls Royce Pastel Colour Rolls Royce Pastel Colour Rolls Royce Pastel Colour Rolls Royce Pastel Colour Rolls Royce Pastel Colour Rolls Royce Pastel Colour Rolls Royce Pastel Colour Rolls Royce Pastel Colour Rolls Royce Pastel Colour Rolls Royce

Photo Credit // Rolls-Royce